Improvement of walking speed prediction by accelerometry and altimetry, validated by satellite positioning.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_DEB684810251
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Improvement of walking speed prediction by accelerometry and altimetry, validated by satellite positioning.
Journal
Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing
Author(s)
Perrin O., Terrier P., Ladetto Q., Merminod B., Schutz Y.
ISSN
0140-0118 (Print)
ISSN-L
0140-0118
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/2000
Volume
38
Number
2
Pages
164-168
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Activity monitors based on accelerometry are used to predict the speed and energy cost of walking at 0% slope, but not at other inclinations. Parallel measurements of body accelerations and altitude variation were studied to determine whether walking speed prediction could be improved. Fourteen subjects walked twice along a 1.3 km circuit with substantial slope variations (-17% to +17%). The parameters recorded were body acceleration using a uni-axial accelerometer, altitude variation using differential barometry, and walking speed using satellite positioning (DGPS). Linear regressions were calculated between acceleration and walking speed, and between acceleration/altitude and walking speed. These predictive models, calculated using the data from the first circuit run, were used to predict speed during the second circuit. Finally the predicted velocity was compared with the measured one. The result was that acceleration alone failed to predict speed (mean r = 0.4). Adding altitude variation improved the prediction (mean r = 0.7). With regard to the altitude/acceleration-speed relationship, substantial inter-individual variation was found. It is concluded that accelerometry, combined with altitude measurement, can assess position variations of humans provided inter-individual variation is taken into account. It is also confirmed that DGPS can be used for outdoor walking speed measurements, opening up new perspectives in the field of biomechanics.
Keywords
Acceleration, Adult, Altitude, Biomechanics, Energy Metabolism/physiology, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Reproducibility of Results, Satellite Communications, Walking/physiology, Walking/statistics & numerical data
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/01/2008 14:09
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:19
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