The role of peptidoglycan in chlamydial cell division: towards resolving the chlamydial anomaly.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_DD20DC13F645
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The role of peptidoglycan in chlamydial cell division: towards resolving the chlamydial anomaly.
Journal
Fems Microbiology Reviews
Author(s)
Jacquier N., Viollier P.H., Greub G.
ISSN
1574-6976 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0168-6445
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Number
2
Pages
262-275
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; ReviewPublication Status: ppublishDocument Type: Review
Abstract
Chlamydiales are obligate intracellular bacteria including some important pathogens causing trachoma, genital tract infections and pneumonia, among others. They share an atypical division mechanism, which is independent of an FtsZ homologue. However, they divide by binary fission, in a process inhibited by penicillin derivatives, causing the formation of an aberrant form of the bacteria, which is able to survive in the presence of the antibiotic. The paradox of penicillin sensitivity of chlamydial cells in the absence of detectable peptidoglycan (PG) was dubbed the chlamydial anomaly, since no PG modified by enzymes (Pbps) that are the usual target of penicillin could be detected in Chlamydiales. We review here the recent advances in this field with the first direct and indirect evidences of PG-like material in both Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-related bacteria. Moreover, PG biosynthesis is required for proper localization of the newly described septal proteins RodZ and NlpD. Taken together, these new results set the stage for a better understanding of the role of PG and septal proteins in the division mechanism of Chlamydiales and illuminate the long-standing chlamydial anomaly. Moreover, understanding the chlamydial division mechanism is critical for the development of new antibiotics for the treatment of chlamydial chronic infections.
Keywords
Bacterial Proteins/metabolism, Cell Division, Chlamydiales/cytology, Chlamydiales/growth & development, Gram-Negative Bacteria/cytology, Peptidoglycan/chemistry, Peptidoglycan/metabolism, Uridine Diphosphate N-Acetylmuramic Acid/analogs & derivatives, Uridine Diphosphate N-Acetylmuramic Acid/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/05/2015 14:54
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:11
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