Chronic pain and antidepressants: A systematic review of efficacy

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_DB9948F9A501
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Title
Chronic pain and antidepressants: A systematic review of efficacy
Title of the conference
11th Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Association for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatics (EACLPP) and the 27th European Conference on Psychosomatic Research (ECPR)
Author(s)
Verdu B., Stiefel F., Berney A.
ISBN
0022-3999
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
64
Series
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Pages
678-678
Language
english
Abstract
Background and aims: chronic pain is a major public health care problem with a prevalence in Europe as high as 19% in the general population (Breivik et al. 2006). Beside classical analgesics, Antidepressants (AD) remain an essential part of the therapeutic armamentarium. The present study was aimed at reviewing current evidence for efficacy of AD in main chronic pain conditions.
Methods: We performed a systematic literature search through Ovid Medline, Psychinfo and Cochrane database to retrieve controlled studies and reviews on the use of AD in specific chronic pain conditions: neuropathic pain, migraine and tension-type headache, muskuloskeletal pain, and fibromyalgia.
Results: There is sufficient data to support the use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) in neuropathic pain, migraine and tension-type headache. There is also good evidence for a beneficial effect of TCAs in chronic low back pain and fibromyalgia. The SNRI venlafaxine and duloxetine are drugs with less established efficacy in neuropathic pain, tension type headache and fibromyalgia, but may be recommended as second line treatment. Available data do not support the use of SSRIs in any of these conditions. Given the limitations of available studies, there is still room to better characterize putative benefits of SNRIs and SSRIs in some of these conditions.
Conclusions: Efficacy of AD in chronic pain appear to vary greatly between type of AD. Beneficial effects when present seem independent of the effect on mood. There is a lack of long term controlled trials in most type of chronic pain conditions.
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Create date
14/10/2009 11:37
Last modification date
20/08/2019 17:00
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