Could Gait Biomechanics Become a Marker of Atypical Neuronal Circuitry in Human Development?-The Example of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_DB8222940DBE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Could Gait Biomechanics Become a Marker of Atypical Neuronal Circuitry in Human Development?-The Example of Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Journal
Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology
Author(s)
Jequier Gygax M., Maillard A.M., Favre J.
ISSN
2296-4185 (Print)
ISSN-L
2296-4185
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Pages
624522
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
This perspective paper presents converging recent knowledge in neurosciences (motor neurophysiology, neuroimaging and neuro cognition) and biomechanics to outline the relationships between maturing neuronal network, behavior, and gait in human development. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) represents a particularly relevant neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD) to study these convergences, as an early life condition presenting with sensorimotor and social behavioral alterations. ASD diagnosis relies solely on behavioral criteria. The absence of biological marker in ASD is a main challenge, and hampers correlations between behavioral development and standardized data such as brain structure alterations, brain connectivity, or genetic profile. Gait, as a way to study motor system development, represents a well-studied, early life ability that can be characterized through standardized biomechanical analysis. Therefore, developmental gait biomechanics might appear as a possible motor phenotype and biomarker, solid enough to be correlated to neuronal network maturation, in normal and atypical developmental trajectories-like in ASD.
Keywords
autism, biomarker, biomechanics, gait, machine learning, neuronal circuit development, patterns, walking
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/04/2021 17:26
Last modification date
20/07/2021 6:38
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