Effectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_DAAC2B06FB1E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients
Journal
European Journal of Cancer Prevention
Author(s)
Bize  R., Stoianov  R., Ruffieux  C., Ghali  W., Paccaud  F., Cornuz  J.
ISSN
0959-8278 (Print)
ISSN-L
0959-8278
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Number
5
Pages
464-70
Language
english
Abstract
Debate exists about how intense smoking cessation interventions for hospitalized patients should be. In this study we assessed the effectiveness of a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention for hospitalized patients, without follow-up phone calls. We designed a cohort study with a historical control group, in the Department of Medicine of an 850-bed teaching hospital. One hundred and seventeen consecutive eligible smokers received the intervention, and 113 smokers hospitalized before the implementation of the intervention constituted the historical control group. The 30-min smoking cessation intervention was performed by a trained resident without any follow-up contact. Counseling was matched to smokers' motivation to quit, and accompanied by a self-help booklet. Nicotine replacement therapy was prescribed when indicated. All patients received a questionnaire to evaluate their smoking habits 6 months after they left hospital. We counted patients lost to follow-up as continuous smokers and smoking abstinence was validated by patients' physicians. Validated smoking cessation rates were 23.9% in the intervention group and 9.7% in the control group (odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.4-6.2). After adjusting for potential confounders, intervention was still effective with an adjusted odds ratio of 2.26 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-4.95). Among those who continued to smoke 6 months after hospitalization, the likelihood of reporting any decrease of cigarette consumption was higher in the intervention cohort (70.8 vs. 42.7%, P=0.001). A low-intensity smoking cessation intervention, based on two visits without any follow-up contact, is associated with a higher quit rate at 6 months than that for historical control patients. Our findings show that a low-intensity smoking cessation intervention, based on two visits without any follow-up contact, is associated with a higher quit rate at 6 months than that for historical control patients.
Keywords
Adolescent Adult Aged Cohort Studies Female *Hospitalization Humans Male Middle Aged Odds Ratio Reproducibility of Results Smoking Cessation/*methods Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 14:42
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:59
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