Peak blood lactate and blood lactate vs. workload during acclimatization to 5,050 m and in deacclimatization.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_D9811D208403
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Peak blood lactate and blood lactate vs. workload during acclimatization to 5,050 m and in deacclimatization.
Journal
Journal of Applied Physiology
Author(s)
Grassi B., Marzorati M., Kayser B., Bordini M., Colombini A., Conti M., Marconi C., Cerretelli P.
ISSN
8750-7587 (Print)
ISSN-L
0161-7567
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1996
Volume
80
Number
2
Pages
685-692
Language
english
Abstract
Peak blood lactate ([Labl]peak) and blood lactate concentration ([Labl]) vs. workload (W) relationships during acclimatization to altitude and in the deacclimatization were evaluated in 10 Caucasian lowlanders at sea level (SL0); after approximately 1 wk (Alt1wk), 3 wk (Alt3wk), and 5 wk (Alt5wk) at 5,050 m; and weekly during the first 5 wk after return to sea level (SL1wk-SL5wk). Incremental bicycle ergometer exercises (30 W added every 4 min up to exhaustion) were performed. At Alt1wk and at Alt5wk, the experiments were repeated in hypobaric normoxia (Alt1wk-O2 and Alt5wk-O2). [Labl] was determined at rest and during the last approximately 30 s of each W. [Labl]peak was taken as the highest [Labl] during recovery. Acid-base status (pH and concentration of HCO-3 in arterialized capillary blood) was determined at rest. Mean [Labl]peak values were 11.5 (SL0), 8.0 (Alt1wk), 6.4 (Alt3wk), 6.3 (Alt5wk), 8.0 (SL1wk), 9.4 (SL2wk), 10.8 (SL3wk), 11.3 (SL4wk), and 11.6 (SL5wk) mM. At Alt1wk-O2 and Alt5wk-O2, peak W increased, compared with Alt1wk and Alt5wk, whereas no changes were observed for [Labl]peak. [Labl] vs. W was shifted to the left (i.e., higher [Labl] values were found for the same W) at Alt1wk compared with SL0 and partially shifted back to the right (i.e., lower [Labl] values were found for the same W) at Alt3wk and Alt5wk. At Alt1wk-O2 and Alt5wk-O2, [Labl] vs. W values were superimposed on that at SL0. At SL1wk-SL5wk, [Labl] vs. W values were shifted to the right compared with that at SL0. At Alt1wk, a condition of respiratory alkalosis was found, which was only partially compensated for during acclimatization. At SL1wk, the acid-base status was back to normal. We conclude that 1) the reduced [Labl]peak at altitude is still present for 2-3 wk after return from altitude; is not attributable to reduced peak W nor to hypoxia per se, nor to a reduced buffer capacity; alternatively, it could be related to some central determinants of fatigue. 2) The [Labl] vs. W leftward shift at altitude was due to hypoxia per se. 3) The factor(s) responsible for the [Labl] vs. W partial rightward shift during acclimatization could still be effective during the first weeks after return to sea level.
Keywords
Acclimatization/physiology, Acid-Base Equilibrium/physiology, Adipose Tissue/physiology, Adult, Altitude, Blood Gas Analysis, Body Composition/physiology, Body Weight/physiology, Exercise/physiology, Hemoglobins/metabolism, Humans, Lactic Acid/blood, Male, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Pulmonary Gas Exchange/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
19/09/2013 10:04
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:58
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