Characteristics of highly frequent users of a Swiss academic emergency department: a retrospective consecutive case series.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_D7415EBA487F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Characteristics of highly frequent users of a Swiss academic emergency department: a retrospective consecutive case series.
Journal
European Journal of Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the European Society For Emergency Medicine
Author(s)
Althaus F., Stucki S., Guyot S., Trueb L., Moschetti K., Daeppen J.B., Bodenmann P.
ISSN
1473-5695 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0969-9546
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
6
Pages
413-419
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, social and medical characteristics, and healthcare use of highly frequent users of a university hospital emergency department (ED) in Switzerland.
METHODS: A retrospective consecutive case series was performed. We included all highly frequent users, defined as patients attending the ED 12 times or more within a calendar year (1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009). We collected their characteristics and calculated a score of accumulation of risk factors of vulnerability.
RESULTS: Highly frequent users comprised 0.1% of ED patients, and they accounted for 0.8% of all ED attendances (23 patients, 425 attendances). Of all highly frequent users, 87% had a primary care practitioner, 82.6% were unemployed, 73.9% were socially isolated, and 60.9% had a mental health or substance use primary diagnosis. One-third had attempted suicide during study period, all of them being women. They were often admitted (24.0% of attendances), and only 8.7% were uninsured. On average, they cumulated 3.3 different risk factors of vulnerability (SD 1.4).
CONCLUSION: Highly frequent users of a Swiss academic ED are a highly vulnerable population. They are in poor health and accumulate several risk factors of being even in poorer health. The small number of patients and their high level of insurance coverage make it particularly feasible to design a specific intervention to approach their needs, in close collaboration with their primary care practitioner. Elaboration of the intervention should focus on social reinsertion and risk-reduction strategies with regard to substance use, hospital admissions and suicide.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
16/05/2013 14:26
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:57
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