Lack of MRI neurohypophyseal bright signal in a child with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_D694C2937A6C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Lack of MRI neurohypophyseal bright signal in a child with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus
Journal
NDT Plus
Author(s)
Chehade H., Parvex P., Anooshiravani M., Schwitzgebel V., Girardin E.
ISSN
1753-0792
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Volume
3
Number
5
Pages
511-512
Language
english
Abstract
Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) is a rare disease characterized by the inability of the kidney to respond to arginine vasopressin (AVP). The absence of the neurohypophyseal 'bright signal' on T1 sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered as an argument in favour of the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (CDI). This observation is challenged as we hereby present a case of a child diagnosed with CNDI and who did not present MRI pituitary bright signal.
A 6-month-old male presented with failure to thrive, polyuria and polydypsia. Family history revealed that the mother, 35 years of age, had been presenting polydypsia and polyuria, and she was investigated at the age of 6 years with no concluding diagnosis. The patient's physical exam showed a weight of 5215 g (−3 DS) and clinical signs of dehydration. The patient's plasma sodium level was 155 mmol/L, osmolality 305 mOsm/kg and urine osmolality 150 mOsm/kg. Brain MRI showed in T1 sequences the absence of the posterior pituitary bright signal suggesting the diagnosis of CDI (Figure 1). The child was treated with synthetic AVP analogue 1-desamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) without improvement, which led to the consideration of CNDI. The diagnosis was confirmed by an elevated serum level of AVP of 214 pmol/L (reference value ≤4.34 pmol/L) and by genetic analysis demonstrating and T106C mutation in the V2R (X-linked CNDI). The child was treated with thiazide diuretic and increased fluids with restricted sodium intake. This resulted in catch-up growth and improved neurological development. A follow-up MRI was performed 6 months after the start of therapy with the same technique. At that time, the child's weight had improved to 9310 g (−1.5 DS) corresponding to a gain of 22 g per day, and he did not present any clinical signs of dehydration and had a normal plasma level of sodium (140 mmol/L). MRI showed that the bright signal was still absent.
Create date
15/02/2011 16:44
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:56
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