Detection of exogenous GHB in blood by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: implications in postmortem toxicology.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_D4EF1EB2CDC5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Detection of exogenous GHB in blood by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: implications in postmortem toxicology.
Journal
Journal of analytical toxicology
Author(s)
Saudan C., Augsburger M., Kintz P., Saugy M., Mangin P.
ISSN
0146-4760 (Print)
ISSN-L
0146-4760
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Number
8
Pages
777-781
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Because GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) is present in both blood and urine of the general population, toxicologists must be able to discriminate between endogenous levels and a concentration resulting from exposure. In this paper, we propose a procedure for the detection of exogenous GHB in blood by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Following liquid-liquid and solid-phase extractions, GHB is derivatized to GHB di-TMS before analysis by GC-C-IRMS. Significant differences in the carbon isotopic ratio (delta(13)C-values > 13.5 per thousand) were found between endogenous and synthetic GHB. Indeed, for postmortem blood samples with different GHB concentrations (range: 13.8-86.3 mg/L), we have obtained GHB delta(13)C-values ranging from -20.6 to -24.7 per thousand, whereas delta(13)C-values for the GHB from police seizure were in the range -38.2 to -50.2 per thousand. In contrast to the use of cut-off concentrations for positive postmortem blood GHB concentrations, this method should provide an unambiguous indication of the drug origin.
Keywords
Carbon Isotopes, Forensic Medicine/methods, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/methods, Humans, Sodium Oxybate/blood, Substance Abuse Detection/methods
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
08/02/2008 18:44
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:10
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