The evaluation of immigrants' credentials: The roles of accreditation, immigrant race, and evaluator biases

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_D2DE667E73D2
Type
Report: a report published by a school or other institution, usually numbered within a series.
Publication sub-type
Working paper: Working papers contain results presented by the author. Working papers aim to stimulate discussions between scientists with interested parties, they can also be the basis to publish articles in specialized journals
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The evaluation of immigrants' credentials: The roles of accreditation, immigrant race, and evaluator biases
Author(s)
Dietz J., Esses V. M., Joshi C., Bennett-AbuAyyash C.
Institution details
Canadian Labour Market and Skills Researcher Network (CLSRN)
Issued date
03/2009
Number
18
Genre
Working paper
Language
english
Abstract
Theories of subtle prejudice imply that personnel decision makers might inadvertently discriminate against immigrant employees, in particular immigrant employees form racial minority groups. The argument is that the ambiguities that are associated with immigrant status (e.g., quality of foreign credentials) release latent biases against minorities. Hence, upon removal of these ambiguities (e.g., recognition of foreign credentials as equivalent to local credentials), discrimination against immigrant employees from minority groups should no longer occur. Experimental research largely confirmed these arguments, showing that participants evaluated the credentials of black immigrant employees less favorably only when the participants harbored latent racial biases and the foreign credentials of the applicants had not been accredited. The results suggest the importance of the official recognition of foreign credentials for the fair treatment of Immigrant employees.
Keywords
Labour Discrimination, Immigrants, Racial Minorities, Prejudice, Credential recognition, Experiment
Create date
11/05/2009 14:20
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:52
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