Search of low-contrast liver lesions in abdominal CT: the importance of scrolling behavior.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_CDDC4FCA5F45
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Search of low-contrast liver lesions in abdominal CT: the importance of scrolling behavior.
Journal
Journal of medical imaging
Author(s)
Ba A., Shams M., Schmidt S., Eckstein M.P., Verdun F.R., Bochud F.O.
ISSN
2329-4302 (Print)
ISSN-L
2329-4302
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Number
4
Pages
045501
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Purpose: Visual search using volumetric images is becoming the standard in medical imaging. However, we do not fully understand how eye movement strategies mediate diagnostic performance. A recent study on computed tomography (CT) images showed that the search strategies of radiologists could be classified based on saccade amplitudes and cross-quadrant eye movements [eye movement index (EMI)] into two categories: drillers and scanners. Approach: We investigate how the number of times a radiologist scrolls in a given direction during analysis of the images (number of courses) could add a supplementary variable to use to characterize search strategies. We used a set of 15 normal liver CT images in which we inserted 1 to 5 hypodense metastases of two different signal contrast amplitudes. Twenty radiologists were asked to search for the metastases while their eye-gaze was recorded by an eye-tracker device (EyeLink1000, SR Research Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada). Results: We found that categorizing radiologists based on the number of courses (rather than EMI) could better predict differences in decision times, percentage of image covered, and search error rates. Radiologists with a larger number of courses covered more volume in more time, found more metastases, and made fewer search errors than those with a lower number of courses. Our results suggest that the traditional definition of drillers and scanners could be expanded to include scrolling behavior. Drillers could be defined as scrolling back and forth through the image stack, each time exploring a different area on each image (low EMI and high number of courses). Scanners could be defined as scrolling progressively through the stack of images and focusing on different areas within each image slice (high EMI and low number of courses). Conclusions: Together, our results further enhance the understanding of how radiologists investigate three-dimensional volumes and may improve how to teach effective reading strategies to radiology residents.
Keywords
computed tomography, image perception, observers’ performance, radiologists’ strategies, scrolling behavior, visual search
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/08/2020 8:36
Last modification date
22/01/2021 7:26
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