Has COVID-19 had a greater impact on female than male oncologists? Results of the ESMO Women for Oncology (W4O) Survey.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_CAF2BC9777BE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Has COVID-19 had a greater impact on female than male oncologists? Results of the ESMO Women for Oncology (W4O) Survey.
Journal
ESMO open
Author(s)
Garrido P., Adjei A.A., Bajpai J., Banerjee S., Berghoff A.S., Choo S.P., Felip E., Furness AJS, Garralda E., Haanen J., Letsch A., Linardou H., Peters S., Sessa C., Tabernero J., Tsang J., Yang J.C., Garassino M.C.
ISSN
2059-7029 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2059-7029
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Number
3
Pages
100131
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
European Society for Medical Oncology Women for Oncology (ESMO W4O) research has previously shown under-representation of female oncologists in leadership roles. As early reports suggested disproportionate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on women, the ESMO W4O Committee initiated a study on the impact of the pandemic on the lives of female and male oncologists.
A questionnaire was sent to ESMO members and put on the ESMO website between 8 June 2020 and 2 July 2020. Questions focused on the working (hospital tasks, laboratory tasks, science) and home (household management, childcare, parent care, personal care) lives of oncologists during and after COVID-19-related lockdowns.
Of 649 respondents, 541 completed the questionnaire. Of these, 58% reported that COVID-19 had affected their professional career, 83% of whom said this was in a negative way (85% of women versus 76% of men). Approximately 86% reported that COVID-19 had changed their personal life and 82% their family life. Women were again significantly more affected than men: personal life (89% versus 78%; P = 0.001); family life (84% versus 77%; P = 0.037). During lockdowns, women reported increased time spent on hospital and laboratory tasks compared with men (53% versus 46% and 33% versus 26%, respectively) and a significantly higher proportion of women than men spent less time on science (39% versus 25%) and personal care (58% versus 39%). After confinement, this trend remained for science (42% versus 23%) and personal care (55% versus 36%).
The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected the professional and home lives of oncologists, especially women. Reduced research time for female oncologists may have long-lasting career consequences, especially for those at key stages in their career. The gender gap for promotion to leadership positions may widen further as a result of the pandemic.
Keywords
COVID-19, gender, inequalities, oncology, survey, woman
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
29/06/2021 10:23
Last modification date
19/11/2021 6:40
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