Are post-error adjustments influenced by beliefs in free will? A failure to replicate Rigoni, Wilquin, Brass and Burle, 2013

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_C8B187839173
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Are post-error adjustments influenced by beliefs in free will? A failure to replicate Rigoni, Wilquin, Brass and Burle, 2013
Journal
Royal Society Open Science
Author(s)
Eben Charlotte, Chen Zhang, Cracco Emiel, Brass Marcel, Billieux Joël, Verbruggen Frederick
ISSN
2054-5703
2054-5703
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Number
11
Pages
200664
Language
english
Abstract
In this pre-registered study, we tried to replicate the study by Rigoni et al. 2013 Cognition 127, 264–269. In the original study, the authors manipulated the participants’ belief in free
will in a between-subject design and subsequently measured post-error slowing (i.e. slower responses after an incorrect trial compared with a correct trial) as a marker of cognitive
control. They found less post-error slowing in the group with reduced belief in free will (anti-free will group) compared with a control group in which belief in free will was not
manipulated. In the present study, we used the same task procedure and the same free will manipulation (Crick text) in an attempt to replicate these findings. However, we used an
online procedure and a larger sample size in order to address concerns about statistical power. Similar to the original study, we also used a questionnaire to measure beliefs in free will as an independent manipulation check. We found a difference in the scores on the questionnaire, thus a reduced belief in free will, after reading the Crick text.
However, we did not find any difference in post-error slowing between the anti-free will and control groups. Our findings are in line with several other recent findings suggesting that the Crick text manipulation affects the participants’ self-reported belief in free will but not their behaviour. The present study can be considered a highpowered failed replication attempt.
Keywords
Replication, Free will, Open Science, Preregistration, Action Control, Post-error slowing
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/11/2020 17:32
Last modification date
12/11/2020 7:10
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