Worldwide border interceptions provide a window into human-mediated global insect movement.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Sous embargo indéterminé.
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C76E9FD77EB1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Worldwide border interceptions provide a window into human-mediated global insect movement.
Journal
Ecological applications
Author(s)
Turner R.M., Brockerhoff E.G., Bertelsmeier C., Blake R.E., Caton B., James A., MacLeod A., Nahrung H.F., Pawson S.M., Plank M.J., Pureswaran D.S., Seebens H., Yamanaka T., Liebhold A.M.
ISSN
1051-0761 (Print)
ISSN-L
1051-0761
Publication state
Published
Issued date
13/07/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
e02412
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
As part of national biosecurity programs, cargo imports, passenger baggage and international mail are inspected at ports of entry to verify compliance with phytosanitary regulations and to directly intercept potentially damaging non-native species to prevent their introduction. Detection of organisms during inspections may also provide crucial information about the species composition and relative arrival rates in invasion pathways that can inform the implementation of other biosecurity practices such as quarantines and surveillance. In most regions, insects are the main taxonomic group encountered during inspections. We gathered insect interception data from nine world regions collected from 1995 - 2019 to compare the composition of species arriving at ports in these regions. Collectively, 8,716 insect species were intercepted in these regions over the last 25 years, with the combined international dataset comprising 1,899,573 interception events, of which 863,972 were identified to species level. Rarefaction analysis indicated that interceptions comprise only a small fraction of species present in invasion pathways. Despite differences in inspection methodologies, as well as differences in the composition of import source regions and imported commodities, we found strong positive correlations in species interception frequencies between regions, particularly within the Hemiptera and Thysanoptera. There were also significant differences in species frequencies among insects intercepted in different regions. Nevertheless, integrating interception data among multiple regions would be valuable for estimating invasion risks for insect species with high likelihoods of introduction as well as for identifying rare but potentially damaging species.
Keywords
Biological invasions, biosecurity, border inspection, invasive species, species composition, species pools
Pubmed
Funding(s)
Fondation Sandoz
Swiss National Science Foundation
Create date
15/07/2021 15:12
Last modification date
29/07/2021 6:39
Usage data