Encapsulated, genetically engineered cells, secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C6FBB46DBD7B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Encapsulated, genetically engineered cells, secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
Journal
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Author(s)
Burcelin R., Rolland E., Dolci W., Germain S., Carrel V., Thorens B.
ISSN
0077-8923[print], 0077-8923[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/1999
Volume
875
Pages
277-285
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Non-insulin-dependent, or type II, diabetes mellitus is characterized by a progressive impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells and by a relative decreased sensitivity of target tissues to the action of this hormone. About one third of type II diabetic patients are treated with oral hypoglycemic agents to stimulate insulin secretion. These drugs however risk inducing hypoglycemia and, over time, lose their efficacy. An alternative treatment is the use of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a gut peptidic hormone with a strong insulinotropic activity. Its activity depends of the presence of normal blood glucose concentrations and therefore does not risk inducing hypoglycemia. GLP-1 can correct hyperglycemia in diabetic patients, even in those no longer responding to hypoglycemic agents. Because it is a peptide, GLP-1 must be administered by injection; this may prevent its wide therapeutic use. Here we propose to use cell lines genetically engineered to secrete a mutant form of GLP-1 which has a longer half-life in vivo but which is as potent as the wild-type peptide. The genetically engineered cells are then encapsulated in semi-permeable hollow fibers for implantation in diabetic hosts for constant, long-term, in situ delivery of the peptide. This approach may be a novel therapy for type II diabetes.
Keywords
Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy, Genetic Engineering, Glucagon/genetics, Glucagon/secretion, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Humans, Membranes, Artificial, Mice, Mutation, Peptide Fragments/genetics, Peptide Fragments/secretion, Protein Precursors/genetics, Protein Precursors/secretion
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 14:41
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:42
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