Incidence of gallbladder lithiasis after ceftriaxone treatment.

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_C6E5B84AA016.P001 (370.17 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C6E5B84AA016
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Incidence of gallbladder lithiasis after ceftriaxone treatment.
Journal
The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Author(s)
Cometta A., Gallot-Lavallée-Villars S., Iten A., Cantoni L., Anderegg A., Gonvers J.J., Glauser M.P.
ISSN
0305-7453
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/1990
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
25
Number
4
Pages
689-695
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Clinical Trial ; Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Ceftriaxone has potent activity against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. While it is eliminated mainly by the kidney, 10-20% of the drug is eliminated in the bile and ceftriaxone salt precipitates have been described in the gallbladder of animals dosed with ceftriaxone. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the incidence of biliary lithiasis 6 and 12 months after treatment with ceftriaxone and to compare it with that in patients treated with amoxycillin/clavulanate. Biliary ultrasonography was performed at the start of treatment, at 6 months and at 12 months after the beginning of the study. One hundred patients were randomized and 74 were evaluable: 34 were given amoxycillin/clavulanate, 40 ceftriaxone. Gallbladder lithiasis developed in one patient 12 months after the amoxycillin/clavulanate treatment and in none in the ceftriaxone treatment arm. Biliary precipitate during ceftriaxone treatment was not looked for because this phenomenon was not known at the beginning of the study, but gallbladder precipitation that was seen in two patients given ceftriaxone during and at the end of treatment, respectively, resolved spontaneously. In conclusion, ceftriaxone treatment does not appear to lead to gallstone formation more often than an antibiotic that is not eliminated through the bile.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Amoxicillin/adverse effects, Bacterial Infections/drug therapy, Bacterial Infections/epidemiology, Ceftriaxone/adverse effects, Cholelithiasis/chemically induced, Cholelithiasis/epidemiology, Clavulanic Acid, Clavulanic Acids/adverse effects, Drug Therapy, Combination/adverse effects, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/01/2008 14:31
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:19
Usage data