Dioecy and chromosomal sex determination are maintained through allopolyploid speciation in the plant genus Mercurialis.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C647D9D3E1E0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Dioecy and chromosomal sex determination are maintained through allopolyploid speciation in the plant genus Mercurialis.
Journal
PLoS genetics
Author(s)
Toups M.A., Vicoso B., Pannell J.R.
ISSN
1553-7404 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1553-7390
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/07/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
18
Number
7
Pages
e1010226
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Polyploidization may precipitate dramatic changes to the genome, including chromosome rearrangements, gene loss, and changes in gene expression. In dioecious plants, the sex-determining mechanism may also be disrupted by polyploidization, with the potential evolution of hermaphroditism. However, while dioecy appears to have persisted through a ploidy transition in some species, it is unknown whether the newly formed polyploid maintained its sex-determining system uninterrupted, or whether dioecy re-evolved after a period of hermaphroditism. Here, we develop a bioinformatic pipeline using RNA-sequencing data from natural populations to demonstrate that the allopolyploid plant Mercurialis canariensis directly inherited its sex-determining region from one of its diploid progenitor species, M. annua, and likely remained dioecious through the transition. The sex-determining region of M. canariensis is smaller than that of its diploid progenitor, suggesting that the non-recombining region of M. annua expanded subsequent to the polyploid origin of M. canariensis. Homeologous pairs show partial sexual subfunctionalization. We discuss the possibility that gene duplicates created by polyploidization might contribute to resolving sexual antagonism.
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Projects / CRSII3_147625
Create date
12/07/2022 10:58
Last modification date
17/07/2022 6:37
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