Self-Reported Violence Experienced by Swiss Prehospital Emergency Care Providers.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C62B815B0053
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Self-Reported Violence Experienced by Swiss Prehospital Emergency Care Providers.
Journal
Emergency medicine international
Author(s)
Savoy S., Carron P.N., Romain-Glassey N., Beysard N.
ISSN
2090-2840 (Print)
ISSN-L
2090-2840
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
2021
Pages
9966950
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Workplace violence is a serious and increasing problem in health care. Nevertheless, only few studies were carried out concerning this topic and then mainly in English-speaking countries. The objectives were to describe the acts of violence experienced by prehospital emergency care providers (PECPs) in the western part of Switzerland between January and December 2016 and to assess the consequences for subsequent PECPs behaviors.
An observational cross-sectional study, carried out using an online survey, has been sent to all 416 PECPs in the Canton of Vaud, in the western, French-speaking, part of Switzerland. The survey contained items of demographic data and items to assess the type and consequence of violence sustained. This was classified as five types: verbal assault, intimidation, physical assault, sexual harassment, and sexual assault.
273 (65.6%) PECPs participated in the survey. During 2016, workplace violence was reported by 229 survey participants (83.9%). Most declared to be the victim of such violence between one and three times during the year. In all cases of violence described, the patient and/or a relative initiated aggressive behavior in 96% of cases. Verbal assaults were the most common (99.2% of all acts), followed by intimidation (72.8%), physical assault (69.6%), and sexual harassment (16.3%). Concerning physical assault, PECPs were predominantly victims of spitting and/or jostling (50%). After a violent event, in 50% of cases, the PECPs modified their behavior owing to the experience of workplace violence; 82% now wear protective vests, and 16% carry weapons for self-defense, such as pepper sprays. Seventy-five percent changed their intervention strategies, acting more carefully and using verbal de-escalation techniques or physical restraints for violent patients.
Workplace violence is frequent and has significant consequences for PECPs. In order to increase their own security, they increased their protection. These results illustrate their feelings of insecurity, which may have deleterious effects on work satisfaction and motivation. Trial Registration. Our article does not report the results of a health care intervention on human participants.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
20/12/2021 11:11
Last modification date
03/02/2022 7:33
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