The evolution of altruism and the serial rediscovery of the role of relatedness.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_C4C456F9ADC3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The evolution of altruism and the serial rediscovery of the role of relatedness.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Kay T., Keller L., Lehmann L.
ISSN
1091-6490 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8424
Publication state
Published
Issued date
17/11/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
117
Number
46
Pages
28894-28898
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The genetic evolution of altruism (i.e., a behavior resulting in a net reduction of the survival and/or reproduction of an actor to benefit a recipient) once perplexed biologists because it seemed paradoxical in a Darwinian world. More than half a century ago, W. D. Hamilton explained that when interacting individuals are genetically related, alleles for altruism can be favored by selection because they are carried by individuals more likely to interact with other individuals carrying the alleles for altruism than random individuals in the population ("kin selection"). In recent decades, a substantial number of supposedly alternative pathways to altruism have been published, leading to controversies surrounding explanations for the evolution of altruism. Here, we systematically review the 200 most impactful papers published on the evolution of altruism and identify 43 evolutionary models in which altruism evolves and where the authors attribute the evolution of altruism to a pathway other than kin selection and/or deny the role of relatedness. An analysis of these models reveals that in every case the life cycle assumptions entail local reproduction and local interactions, thereby leading to interacting individuals being genetically related. Thus, contrary to the authors' claims, Hamilton's relatedness drives the evolution to altruism in their models. The fact that several decades of investigating the evolution to altruism have resulted in the systematic and unwitting rediscovery of the same mechanism is testament to the fundamental importance of positive relatedness between actor and recipient for explaining the evolution of altruism.
Keywords
Altruism, Animals, Biological Evolution, Cooperative Behavior, Humans, Models, Genetic, Selection, Genetic/genetics, Hamilton’s rule, altruism, evolution, kin selection, rediscovery
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/10/2020 11:59
Last modification date
27/01/2021 6:27
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