Überinfusion von Verbrennungsopfern: häufig und schädlich [Over infusion in burn victims: frequent and injurious]

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Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_C49044D80A2E.P001 (822.91 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
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It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C49044D80A2E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Überinfusion von Verbrennungsopfern: häufig und schädlich [Over infusion in burn victims: frequent and injurious]
Journal
Notfall und Rettungsmedizin
Author(s)
Michaeli B., Carron P.N., Revelly J.P., Bernath M.A., Schrag C., Berger M.M.
ISSN
1436-0578
ISSN-L
1434-6222
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Volume
16
Number
1
Pages
42-47
Language
german
Notes
Document Type: Article
Abstract
Major burns are characterized by an initial capillary leak, which requires fluid resuscitation for hemodynamic stabilization. While under resuscitation was the major cause of death until the 1980s, over resuscitation has become an important source of complications, including abdominal compartment syndrome, escharosis, impaired gas exchange with prolonged mechanical ventilation and hospital stay. Fluid over infusion started in the 1990s with an increasing proportion of the fluid delivered within the first 24 h being well above the 4 ml/kg/% burn surface area (BSA) according to the Parkland formula. The first alerts were published in the form of case reports of increased mortality due to abdominal compartment syndrome and respiratory failure.
This paper analyses the causes of this fluid over infusion and the ways to prevent it, which include rationing prehospital fluid delivery, avoiding early administration of colloids and prevention by permissive hypovolemia.
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/04/2013 9:26
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:19
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