Dietary Factors and Modulation of Bacteria Strains of Akkermansia muciniphila and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: A Systematic Review.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C2F87D438B49
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Dietary Factors and Modulation of Bacteria Strains of Akkermansia muciniphila and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii: A Systematic Review.
Journal
Nutrients
Author(s)
Verhoog S., Taneri P.E., Roa Díaz Z.M., Marques-Vidal P., Troup J.P., Bally L., Franco O.H., Glisic M., Muka T.
ISSN
2072-6643 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2072-6643
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/07/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Number
7
Pages
1565
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Systematic Review
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Akkermansia muciniphila and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii are highly abundant human gut microbes in healthy individuals, and reduced levels are associated with inflammation and alterations of metabolic processes involved in the development of type 2 diabetes. Dietary factors can influence the abundance of A. muciniphila and F. prausnitzii, but the evidence is not clear. We systematically searched PubMed and Embase to identify clinical trials investigating any dietary intervention in relation to A. muciniphila and F. prausnitzii. Overall, 29 unique trials were included, of which five examined A. muciniphila, 19 examined F. prausnitzii, and six examined both, in a total of 1444 participants. A caloric restriction diet and supplementation with pomegranate extract, resveratrol, polydextrose, yeast fermentate, sodium butyrate, and inulin increased the abundance of A. muciniphila, while a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols decreased the abundance of A. muciniphila. For F. prausnitzii, the main studied intervention was prebiotics (e.g. fructo-oligosaccharides, inulin type fructans, raffinose); seven studies reported an increase after prebiotic intervention, while two studies reported a decrease, and four studies reported no difference. Current evidence suggests that some dietary factors may influence the abundance of A. muciniphila and F. prausnitzii. However, more research is needed to support these microflora strains as targets of microbiome shifts with dietary intervention and their use as medical nutrition therapy in prevention and management of chronic disease.
Keywords
Diet, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii/drug effects, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Verrucomicrobia/drug effects, Akkermansia muciniphila, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, dietary interventions, microbiome, randomized controlled trials, systematic review
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/08/2019 15:24
Last modification date
24/01/2020 7:19
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