IQ predictors in pediatric opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome: a large international cohort study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C2F638C47159
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
IQ predictors in pediatric opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome: a large international cohort study.
Journal
Developmental medicine and child neurology
Author(s)
Sheridan A., Kapur K., Pinard F., Dietrich Alber F., Camposano S., Pike M.G., Klein A., Gorman M.P.
ISSN
1469-8749 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0012-1622
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
62
Number
12
Pages
1444-1449
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
To determine predictors of full-scale IQ (FSIQ) in an international pediatric opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS) cohort.
In this retrospective and prospective cohort study at three academic medical centers (2006-2013), the primary outcome measure, FSIQ, was categorized based on z-score: above average (≥+1), average (+1 to -1), mildly impaired (-1 to -2), and impaired (<-2). Univariate analysis and multivariable linear regression modeling using stepwise selection with Akaike's information criterion was performed to understand the relationship between exposures and FSIQ.
Of 81 participants, 37 with sufficient data had mean FSIQ 84.38 (SD 20.55) and median 90 (40-114) at latest available evaluation (mean age 8y 5mo). Twenty (54%), nine (24.3%), and eight (21.6%) had normal, mildly impaired, and impaired FSIQ respectively. The final multivariable linear regression model included 34 participants with evaluable data: number of relapses occurring before neuropsychological testing (p<0.001) and OMS severity score at last follow-up (p<0.001) predicted FSIQ (adjusted R <sup>2</sup> =0.64). There was a mean decrease of 2.4 FSIQ points per OMS relapse.
Number of relapses negatively correlates with FSIQ in pediatric OMS. Demographic and clinical measures available at OMS onset did not predict FSIQ. Strategies to reduce OMS relapses may improve intellectual outcomes.
Keywords
Adolescent, Child, Female, Humans, Intelligence/physiology, Male, Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/physiopathology, Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/therapy, Prospective Studies, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Severity of Illness Index
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/07/2020 13:41
Last modification date
16/04/2024 7:11
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