Adult hepatoblastoma: learning from children.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C2E5DAF388C0
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Title
Adult hepatoblastoma: learning from children.
Journal
Journal of Hepatology
Author(s)
Rougemont A.L., McLin V.A., Toso C., Wildhaber B.E.
ISSN
1600-0641 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0168-8278
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
56
Number
6
Pages
1392-1403
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Hepatoblastoma is the most common malignant liver tumour in infants and young children. Its occurrence in the adult population is debated and has been questioned. The aim of this paper is to review the histological and clinical features of adult hepatoblastoma as described in the adult literature, and to compare the findings with those of paediatric hepatoblastoma. The developmental and molecular aspects of hepatoblastoma are reviewed and their potential contribution to diagnosis of adult hepatoblastoma discussed. Case reports of adult hepatoblastoma identified by a PubMed search of the English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish literature through March 2011 were reviewed. Forty-five cases of hepatoblastoma were collected. Age at presentation was variable. Survival was uniformly poor, except for the rare patients who presented with the relatively differentiated, foetal type. The common denominator between adult and paediatric cases is the occurrence of embryonal or immature aspect of the tumours. Whether the adult cases of hepatoblastoma represent blastemal tumours, stem cell tumours, or unusual differentiation patterns in otherwise more frequent adult liver tumours remains to be established. Adult tumours labelled as hepatoblastoma are characterised by malignant appearing mesenchymal components. Surgical management is the cornerstone of therapy in children and also appears to confer an improved prognosis in adults. Whether adult hepatoblastoma exists, remains controversial. Indeed, several features described in adult cases are markedly different from hepatoblastoma as it is understood in children, and other differential diagnoses should also be entertained. Nonetheless, hepatoblastoma should be considered in adults presenting with primary liver tumours in the absence of pre-existing liver disease. Adult and paediatric patients with immature hepatoblastoma appear to have worse outcomes, and adults presenting with presumed hepatoblastoma have an overall poorer prognosis than children with hepatoblastoma. In all patients, surgery should be the treatment of choice, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is advisable.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Diagnosis, Differential, Hepatoblastoma/diagnosis, Hepatoblastoma/pathology, Humans, Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis, Liver Neoplasms/pathology, Middle Aged
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/02/2015 12:50
Last modification date
09/05/2019 0:51
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