Treatment of genital mycoplasma in colonized pregnant women in late pregnancy is associated with a lower rate of premature labour and neonatal complications.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C1A3987A4796
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Treatment of genital mycoplasma in colonized pregnant women in late pregnancy is associated with a lower rate of premature labour and neonatal complications.
Journal
Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Author(s)
Vouga M., Greub G., Prod'hom G., Durussel C., Roth-Kleiner M., Vasilevsky S., Baud D.
ISSN
1469-0691 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1198-743X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
10
Pages
1074-1079
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Abstract
Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma spp. may colonize the human genital tract and have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm labour and preterm premature rupture of membranes. However, as these bacteria can reside in the normal vaginal flora, there are controversies regarding their true role during pregnancy and so the need to treat these organisms. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate the treatment of genital mycoplasma in 5377 pregnant patients showing symptoms of potential obstetric complications at 25-37 weeks of gestation. Women presenting with symptoms were routinely screened by culture for the presence of these bacteria and treated with clindamycin when positive. Compared with uninfected untreated patients, women treated for genital mycoplasma demonstrated lower rates of premature labour. Indeed preterm birth rates were, respectively, 40.9% and 37.7% in women colonized with Ureaplasma spp. and M. hominis, compared with 44.1% in uncolonized women (Ureaplasma spp., p 0.024; M. hominis, p 0.001). Moreover, a reduction of neonatal complications rates was observed, with 10.9% of newborns developing respiratory diseases in case of Ureaplasma spp. colonization and 5.9% in the presence of M. hominis, compared with 12.8% in the absence of those bacteria (Ureaplasma spp., p 0.050; M. hominis, p <0.001). Microbiological screening of Ureaplasma spp. and/or M. hominis and pre-emptive antibiotic therapy of symptomatic pregnant women in late pregnancy might represent a beneficial strategy to reduce premature labour and neonatal complications.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
02/01/2015 9:38
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:36
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