Exploring the relative DNA contribution of first and second object's users on mock touch DNA mixtures

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Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C0D8F3E2A3DF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Exploring the relative DNA contribution of first and second object's users on mock touch DNA mixtures
Journal
Forensic Science International: Genetics Supplement Series
Author(s)
Oldoni F., Castella V., Hall D.
ISSN
1875-1768
ISSN-L
1875-1768
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
5
Pages
e300-e301
Language
english
Abstract
Contact stains recovered at break-in crime scenes are frequently characterized by mixtures of DNA from several persons. Broad knowledge on the relative contribution of DNA left behind by different users overtime is of paramount importance. Such information might help crime investigators to robustly evaluate the possibility of detecting a specific (or known) individual's DNA profile based on the type and history of an object. To address this issue, a contact stain simulation-based protocol was designed. Fourteen volunteers either acting as first or second object's users were recruited. The first user was required to regularly handle/wear 9 different items during an 8-10-day period, whilst the second user for 5, 30 and 120 min, in three independent simulation sessions producing a total of 231 stains. Subsequently, the relative DNA profile contribution of each individual pair was investigated. Preliminary results showed a progressive increase of the percentage contribution of the second user compared to the first. Interestingly, the second user generally became the major DNA contributor when most objects were handled/worn for 120 min, Furthermore, the observation of unexpected additional alleles will then prompt the investigation of indirect DNA transfer events.
Keywords
Touch DNA, Contact stain, DNA transfer
Web of science
Create date
16/12/2015 10:46
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:35
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