Sexual selection reveals a cost of pathogen resistance undetected in life-history assays.

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Ressource 1Download: Kawecki 2019 Evolution.pdf (320.91 [Ko])
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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC 4.0
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Download: Kawecki 2019 Evolution Supplementary Material.pdf (544.66 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Supplementary document
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_C0A80531EA8B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sexual selection reveals a cost of pathogen resistance undetected in life-history assays.
Journal
Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
Author(s)
Kawecki T.J.
ISSN
1558-5646 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0014-3820
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
74
Number
2
Pages
338-348
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Mechanisms of resistance to pathogens and parasites are thought to be costly and thus to lead to evolutionary trade-offs between resistance and life-history traits expressed in the absence of the infective agents. On the other hand, sexually selected traits are often proposed to indicate "good genes" for resistance, which implies a positive genetic correlation between resistance and success in sexual selection. Here I show that experimental evolution of improved resistance to the intestinal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila in Drosophila melanogaster was associated with a reduction in male sexual success. Males from four resistant populations achieved lower paternity than males from four susceptible control populations in competition with males from a competitor strain, indicating an evolutionary cost of resistance in terms of mating success and/or sperm competition. In contrast, no costs were found in larval viability, larval competitive ability and population productivity assayed under nutritional limitation; together with earlier studies this suggests that the costs of P. entomophila resistance for nonsexual fitness components are negligible. Thus, rather than indicating heritable pathogen resistance, sexually selected traits expressed in the absence of pathogens may be sensitive to costs of resistance, even if no such costs are detected in other fitness traits.
Keywords
Costs of resistance, Hamilton-Zuk, experimental evolution, good genes, immunocompetence, trade-offs
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
University of Lausanne
Swiss National Science Foundation / Projects / 310030_184791
Create date
15/12/2019 18:23
Last modification date
18/02/2020 7:20
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