Laparoscopic and open colorectal surgery in everyday practice: retrospective study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C07D1BCB7C5F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Laparoscopic and open colorectal surgery in everyday practice: retrospective study.
Journal
Anz Journal of Surgery
Author(s)
Wahl P., Hahnloser D., Chanson C., Givel J.C.
ISSN
1445-1433 (Print)
ISSN-L
1445-1433
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2006
Volume
76
Number
1-2
Pages
20-27
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most studies available on laparoscopic colorectal surgery focus on highly selected patient groups. The aim of the present study was to review short- and long-term outcome of everyday patients treated in a general surgery department.
METHODS: Retrospective review was carried out of a prospective database of all consecutive patients having undergone primary laparoscopic (LAP) or open colorectal surgery between March 1993 and December 1997. Follow-up data were completed via questionnaire.
RESULTS: A total of 187 patients underwent LAP resection and 215 patients underwent open surgery. Follow up was complete in 95% with a median of 59 months (range, 1-107 months) and 53 months (range, 1-104 months), respectively. There were 28 conversions (15%) in the LAP group and these remained in the LAP group in an intention-to-treat analysis. The LAP operations lasted significantly longer for all types of resections (205 vs 150 min, P < 0.001) and hospital stay was shorter (8 vs 13 days, P < 0.001). Recovery of intestinal function was faster in the LAP group, but only after left-sided procedures (3 vs 4 days, P < 0.01). However, preoperative patient selection (more emergency operations and patients with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score in the open group) had a major influence on these elements and favours the LAP group. Surprisingly, the overall surgical complication rate (including long-term complications such as wound hernia) was 20% in both groups with rates of individual complications also being comparable in both groups.
CONCLUSION: Despite a patient selection favourable to the laparoscopy group, only little advantage in postoperative outcome could be shown for the minimally invasive over the open approach in the everyday patient.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Colectomy/methods, Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery, Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects, Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods, Diverticulum, Colon/surgery, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Laparoscopy, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
28/01/2008 9:56
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:34
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