Less favourable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_C01AC8D5AC04
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Letter (letter): Communication to the publisher.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Less favourable climates constrain demographic strategies in plants.
Journal
Ecology letters
Author(s)
Csergő A.M., Salguero-Gómez R., Broennimann O., Coutts S.R., Guisan A., Angert A.L., Welk E., Stott I., Enquist B.J., McGill B., Svenning J.C., Violle C., Buckley Y.M.
ISSN
1461-0248 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1461-023X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Number
8
Pages
969-980
Language
english
Abstract
Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species' occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a relationship between predicted climate suitability and population performance. We found that the performance of 93 populations of 34 plant species worldwide - as measured by in situ population growth rate, its temporal variation and extinction risk - was not correlated with climate suitability. However, correlations of demographic processes underpinning population performance with climate suitability indicated both resistance and vulnerability pathways of population responses to climate: in less suitable climates, plants experienced greater retrogression (resistance pathway) and greater variability in some demographic rates (vulnerability pathway). While a range of demographic strategies occur within species' climatic niches, demographic strategies are more constrained in climates predicted to be less suitable.

Keywords
COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database, Climate change, demographic compensation, ecological niche models, matrix population models, population dynamics, spatial demography, species distribution models, species interactions-abiotic stress hypothesis, stress gradient hypothesis
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
22/06/2017 17:37
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:34
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