Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children: a concise narrative review.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_BF920BF67B21
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Title
Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children: a concise narrative review.
Journal
European journal of pediatrics
Author(s)
Fiore E., Rizzi M., Simonetti G.D., Garzoni L., Bianchetti M.G., Bettinelli A.
ISSN
1432-1076 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0340-6199
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
170
Number
12
Pages
1507-1511
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Acute hemorrhagic edema of young children is an uncommon but likely underestimated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The condition typically affects infants 6-24 months of age with a history of recent respiratory illness with or without course of antibiotics. The diagnosis is made in children, mostly nontoxic in appearance, presenting with nonpruritic, large, round, red to purpuric plaques predominantly over the cheeks, ears, and extremities, with relative sparing of the trunk, often with a target-like appearance, and edema of the distal extremities, ears, and face that is mostly non-pitting, indurative, and tender. In boys, the lesions sometimes involve the scrotum and, more rarely, the penis. Fever, typically of low grade, is often present. Involvement of body systems other than skin is uncommon, and spontaneous recovery usually occurs within 6-21 days without sequelae. In this condition, laboratory tests are non-contributory: total blood cell count is often normal, although leukocytosis and thrombocytosis are sometimes found, clotting studies are normal, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein test are normal or slightly elevated, complement level is normal, autoantibodies are absent, and urinalysis is usually normal. Experienced physicians rapidly consider the possible diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema when presented with a nontoxic young child having large targetoid purpuric lesions and indurative swelling, which is non-pitting in character, and make the diagnosis either on the basis of clinical findings alone or supported by a skin biopsy study.
Keywords
Acute Disease, Child, Preschool, Diagnosis, Differential, Edema/diagnosis, Edema/etiology, Hemorrhage/diagnosis, Hemorrhage/etiology, Humans, Infant, Skin Diseases/diagnosis, Vasculitis/complications, Vasculitis/diagnosis
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
08/03/2021 12:03
Last modification date
13/03/2021 7:26
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