Genetic Association of Recovery from Eating Disorders: The Role of GABA Receptor SNPs.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_BEE86E381580
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Genetic Association of Recovery from Eating Disorders: The Role of GABA Receptor SNPs.
Journal
Neuropsychopharmacology
Author(s)
Bloss C.S., Berrettini W., Bergen A.W., Magistretti P., Duvvuri V., Strober M., Brandt H., Crawford S., Crow S., Fichter M.M., Halmi K.A., Johnson C., Kaplan A.S., Keel P., Klump K.L., Mitchell J., Treasure J., Woodside D.B., Marzola E., Schork N.J., Kaye W.H.
ISSN
1740-634X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0006-3223
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
36
Number
11
Pages
2222-32
Language
english
Abstract
Follow-up studies of eating disorders (EDs) suggest outcomes ranging from recovery to chronic illness or death, but predictors of outcome have not been consistently identified. We tested 5151 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in approximately 350 candidate genes for association with recovery from ED in 1878 women. Initial analyses focused on a strictly defined discovery cohort of women who were over age 25 years, carried a lifetime diagnosis of an ED, and for whom data were available regarding the presence (n=361 ongoing symptoms in the past year, ie, 'ill') or absence (n=115 no symptoms in the past year, ie, 'recovered') of ED symptoms. An intronic SNP (rs17536211) in GABRG1 showed the strongest statistical evidence of association (p=4.63 × 10(-6), false discovery rate (FDR)=0.021, odds ratio (OR)=0.46). We replicated these findings in a more liberally defined cohort of women age 25 years or younger (n=464 ill, n=107 recovered; p=0.0336, OR=0.68; combined sample p=4.57 × 10(-6), FDR=0.0049, OR=0.55). Enrichment analyses revealed that GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) SNPs were over-represented among SNPs associated at p<0.05 in both the discovery (Z=3.64, p=0.0003) and combined cohorts (Z=2.07, p=0.0388). In follow-up phenomic association analyses with a third independent cohort (n=154 ED cases, n=677 controls), rs17536211 was associated with trait anxiety (p=0.049), suggesting a possible mechanism through which this variant may influence ED outcome. These findings could provide new insights into the development of more effective interventions for the most treatment-resistant patients.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
30/09/2011 16:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:33
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