Pieris brassicae eggs trigger inter-plant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis.

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Version: Author's accepted manuscript
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_BD395E70B8CD
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Pieris brassicae eggs trigger inter-plant systemic acquired resistance against a foliar pathogen in Arabidopsis.
Journal
The New phytologist
Author(s)
Orlovskis Zigmunds, Reymond Philippe
ISSN
1469-8137 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-646X
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Recognition of plant pathogens or herbivores activate a broad-spectrum plant defense priming in distal leaves against potential future attacks, leading to systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Additionally, attacked plants can release aerial or belowground signals that trigger defense responses, such as SAR, in neighboring plants lacking initial exposure to pathogen or pest elicitors. However, molecular mechanisms involved in inter-plant defense signal generation in sender plants and decoding in neighboring plants are not fully understood. We previously reported that Pieris brassicae eggs induce intra-plant SAR against the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we extend this effect to neighboring plants by discovering an egg-induced inter-plant SAR via mobile root-derived signal(s). The generation of egg-induced inter-plant SAR signal requires pipecolic acid (Pip) pathway genes ALD1 and FMO1 but occurs independently of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation in sender plants. Furthermore, reception of the signal leads to accumulation of SA in the recipient plants. In response to insect eggs, plants may induce inter-plant SAR to prepare for potential pathogen invasion following feeding-induced wounding or to keep neighboring plants healthy for hatching larvae. Our results highlight a previously uncharacterized belowground plant-to-plant signaling mechanism and reveals genetic components required for its generation.
Keywords
belowground signals, insect eggs, neighborhood effects, plant pathogens, plant-herbivore interactions, plant-plant interactions, systemic acquired resistance (SAR)
Pubmed
Create date
08/07/2020 12:57
Last modification date
10/07/2020 7:10
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