Insect-damaged Arabidopsis moves like wounded Mimosa pudica.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_BD2338AE4320
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Insect-damaged Arabidopsis moves like wounded Mimosa pudica.
Journal
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Author(s)
Kurenda A., Nguyen C.T., Chételat A., Stolz S., Farmer E.E.
ISSN
1091-6490 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8424
Publication state
Published
Issued date
17/12/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
116
Number
51
Pages
26066-26071
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Slow wave potentials (SWPs) are damage-induced electrical signals which, based on experiments in which organs are burned, have been linked to rapid increases in leaf or stem thickness. The possibility that pressure surges in injured xylem underlie these events has been evoked frequently. We sought evidence for insect feeding-induced positive pressure changes in the petioles of Arabidopsis thaliana Instead, we found that petiole surfaces of leaves distal to insect-feeding sites subsided. We also found that insect damage induced longer-duration downward leaf movements in undamaged leaves. The transient petiole deformations were contemporary with and dependent on the SWP. We then investigated if mutants that affect the xylem, which has been implicated in SWP transmission, might modify SWP architecture. irregular xylem mutants strongly affected SWP velocity and kinetics and, in parallel, restructured insect damage-induced petiole deformations. Together, with force change measurements on the primary vein, the results suggest that extravascular water fluxes accompany the SWP. Moreover, petiole deformations in Arabidopsis mimic parts of the spectacular distal leaf collapse phase seen in wounded Mimosa pudica We genetically link electrical signals to organ movement and deformation and suggest an evolutionary origin of the large leaf movements seen in wounded Mimosa.
Keywords
Animals, Arabidopsis/parasitology, Arabidopsis/physiology, Electric Stimulation, Electricity, Insecta/physiology, Kinetics, Larva/physiology, Lepidoptera/physiology, Mimosa/physiology, Plant Leaves/parasitology, Plant Leaves/physiology, Plant Physiological Phenomena, Xylem, jasmonate, pressure, slow wave potential, wound, xylem
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/12/2019 22:58
Last modification date
15/07/2020 6:26
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