Pourquoi se priver de copier? L'introduction d'un système suisse de brevets d'invention et de protection des dessins et des modèles, 1876-1888

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_BD1FF9D350AB
Type
A part of a book
Publication sub-type
Chapter: chapter ou part
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Pourquoi se priver de copier? L'introduction d'un système suisse de brevets d'invention et de protection des dessins et des modèles, 1876-1888
Title of the book
Nouvelles contributions à l'histoire économique
Author(s)
Chachereau N.
Publisher
Chronos Verlag
Address of publication
Zürich
ISBN
978-3-0340-1283-6
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Editor
David Thomas, Straumann Tobias, Teuscher Simon
Volume
30
Series
Annuaire suisse d'histoire économique et sociale
Pages
91-108
Language
french
Abstract
In the 1880s, Swiss industrial companies enjoyed a double legal advantage. On the one hand, as there was no Swiss patent law, they could use new technology without fearing litigation. On the other, they could patent their own innovations abroad, because Switzerland participated in the international convention for industrial property. In 1888, however, a first Swiss patent law was passed. This article examines why industrialists accepted to give up the ability to freely copy technologies. Previous research has emphasized the role of ideological change and international pressure. This article focuses instead on the neglected Swiss movements which lobbied for adoption of a patent law. The organisation and strategies of several industries were evolving to confront the economic recession of the 1870s to 1890s and a patent law fit in with these renewed strategies. In watchmaking and embroidery, patents were an important part of efforts to differentiate products and build own brands. For the mechanical engineering and machine industry, another relevant group, patents played an increasingly significant role in the context of a changing innovation system, greater importance of the domestic market and needs for external financing. This emphasis on innovation and product differentiation, as well as a new understanding of the role of the state in the economy, was shared by other interest groups. This then lead to wider support for the patent law which was eventually enacted.
Create date
28/10/2015 10:01
Last modification date
21/08/2019 5:17
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