Effector-Specific Characterization of Brain Dynamics in Manual vs. Oculomotor Go/NoGo Tasks.

Details

Ressource 1Download: fnhum-14-600667.pdf (2807.90 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_BCEC3A11A52A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effector-Specific Characterization of Brain Dynamics in Manual vs. Oculomotor Go/NoGo Tasks.
Journal
Frontiers in human neuroscience
Author(s)
Simonet Marie, Ruggeri Paolo, Barral Jérôme
ISSN
1662-5161 (Print)
ISSN-L
1662-5161
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Pages
600667
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Motor inhibitory control (IC), the ability to suppress unwanted actions, has been previously shown to rely on domain-general IC processes that are involved in a wide range of IC tasks. Nevertheless, the existence of effector-specific regions and activation patterns that would differentiate manual vs. oculomotor response inhibition remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the brain dynamics supporting these two response effectors with the same IC task paradigm. We examined the behavioral performance and electrophysiological activity in a group of healthy young people (n = 25) with a Go/NoGo task using the index finger for the manual modality and the eyes for the oculomotor modality. By computing topographic analysis of variance, we found significant differences between topographies of scalp recorded potentials of the two response effectors between 250 and 325 ms post-stimulus onset. The source estimations localized this effect within the left precuneus, a part of the superior parietal lobule, showing stronger activity in the oculomotor modality than in the manual modality. Behaviorally, we found a significant positive correlation in response time between the two modalities. Our collective results revealed that while domain-general IC processes would be engaged across different response effectors in the same IC task, effector-specific activation patterns exist. In this case, the stronger activation of the left precuneus likely accounts for the increased demand for visual attentional processes in the oculomotor Go/NoGo task.
Keywords
Biological Psychiatry, Behavioral Neuroscience, Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology, Neurology, Psychiatry and Mental health, electroencephalogram, inhibitory control, precuneus, source localization, topographic analysis of variance
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
University of Lausanne
Create date
03/12/2020 13:12
Last modification date
24/02/2021 7:24
Usage data