Can the distinction between intentional and unintentional interference control help differentiate varieties of impulsivity?

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Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_BC9936F8546C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Can the distinction between intentional and unintentional interference control help differentiate varieties of impulsivity?
Journal
Journal of Research in Personality
Author(s)
Philippe Gay, Courvoisier Delphine S., Billieux Joël, Rochat Lucien, Schmidt Ralph E., Van der Linden Martial
ISSN
0092-6566
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
44
Number
1
Pages
46-52
Language
english
Abstract
It has recently been shown that perseverance specifically relates to resisting proactive interference [Gay,
P., Rochat, L., Billieux, J., d’Acremont, M., & Van der Linden, M. (2008). Heterogeneous inhibition processes
involved in different facets of self-reported impulsivity: Evidence from a community sample. Acta Psychologica,
129, 332–339]. The aim of this study was to replicate and extend this finding by investigating the
relationships between unintentional control of interference (in a recent-negatives task), intentional control
of interference (in a directed-forgetting task), and the four facets of impulsivity. The performance of
71 volunteers indicated that the relevant variables of the two tasks shared very little or no variance. In
particular, regression analyses showed that lower perseverance (i.e., higher impulsivity on this facet) predicted
more interference-related errors in both tasks and less time dedicated to resolving proactive interference;
however, lower perseverance did not predict directed-forgetting cost. Higher urgency predicted
higher interference time due to response-conflict.
Keywords
Impulsivity, Inhibition, Interference
Web of science
Create date
10/01/2020 10:31
Last modification date
24/01/2020 11:17
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