Les natures mortes de Paul Gauguin: une production picturale méconnue

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_BBA43D0B1F17
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Les natures mortes de Paul Gauguin: une production picturale méconnue
Journal
Artibus et Historiae
Author(s)
Lovis Béatrice
ISSN
0391-9064
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Number
59
Pages
159-178
Language
french
Abstract
Gauguin's first attempts at still-life painting, around 1875, followed the Dutch tradition, influenced mainly by Manet's palette. But he did take occasional liberties in depicting flowers with more fluid colour and dynamic backgrounds. From 1879 his style shows the influence of the Impressionists: Pissarro in the landscapes and Degas in the composition of his still-lifes. He was also open to the new trends which were developing among artists in Paris and applied them in his paintings, using still-lifes as his main means for testing them. He did not escape the contemporary fascination with Japonism, and even experimented briefly with Pointillism in Still Life with Horse's Head. His stays in Britain between 1886 and 1890 correspond to an extremely rich and innovative period for him, in which still-lifes served for increasing experimentation. "Fête Gloanec" and Three Puppies reflect his preoccupations: rejection of perspective, use of areas of flat colour, and mixed styles. These pictures amount to an aesthetic manifesto; many of them are also imbued with strong symbolism, as in the Portrait of Meyer de Haan, which is a melancholic reflection on the fall of man. In Still-Life with Japanese Print, frail blue flowers seem to come out of the head of the artist-martyr, a pure product of the painter's "restless imagination". Thus Gauguin showed that art is an "abstraction" through a genre which was reputed to lend itself with difficulty to anything other than mimesis. Although he moved away from still-life after 1890, Gauguin is one of the first artists to radically renew its role and the status of still-life at the end of the 19th century, well before the Fauvists and Cubists.
Create date
29/01/2010 21:01
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:29
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