Photosensitive Alternative Splicing of the Circadian Clock Gene <i>timeless</i> Is Population Specific in a Cold-Adapted Fly, <i>Drosophila montana</i>.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_BB77B76435C1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Photosensitive Alternative Splicing of the Circadian Clock Gene <i>timeless</i> Is Population Specific in a Cold-Adapted Fly, <i>Drosophila montana</i>.
Journal
G3
Author(s)
Tapanainen R., Parker D.J., Kankare M.
ISSN
2160-1836 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2160-1836
Publication state
Published
Issued date
28/03/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
4
Pages
1291-1297
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
To function properly, organisms must adjust their physiology, behavior and metabolism in response to a suite of varying environmental conditions. One of the central regulators of these changes is organisms' internal circadian clock, and recent evidence has suggested that the clock genes are also important in the regulation of seasonal adjustments. In particular, thermosensitive splicing of the core clock gene <i>timeless</i> in a cosmopolitan fly, <i>Drosophila melanogaster</i> , has implicated this gene to be involved in thermal adaptation. To further investigate this link we examined the splicing of <i>timeless</i> in a northern malt fly species, <i>Drosophila montana</i> , which can withstand much colder climatic conditions than its southern relative. We studied northern and southern populations from two different continents (North America and Europe) to find out whether and how the splicing of this gene varies in response to different temperatures and day lengths. Interestingly, we found that the expression of <i>timeless</i> splice variants was sensitive to differences in light conditions, and while the flies of all study populations showed a change in the usage of splice variants in constant light compared to LD 22:2, the direction of the shift varied between populations. Overall, our findings suggest that the splicing of <i>timeless</i> in northern <i>Drosophila montana</i> flies is photosensitive, rather than thermosensitive and highlights the value of studying multiple species and populations in order to gain perspective on the generality of gene function changes in different kinds of environmental conditions.
Keywords
3' Untranslated Regions/genetics, Adaptation, Physiological/genetics, Alternative Splicing/genetics, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Base Sequence, Circadian Clocks/genetics, Cold Temperature, Drosophila/genetics, Drosophila/physiology, Drosophila Proteins/genetics, Drosophila Proteins/metabolism, Female, Genes, Insect, Geography, Introns/genetics, Light, Mutation/genetics, Alternative splicing, Drosophila montana, light-dark cycle, temperature, timeless
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/04/2018 14:14
Last modification date
17/01/2020 7:18
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