Posttraumatic growth in palliative care patients and its associations with psychological distress and quality of life.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_BB520E1839AC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Posttraumatic growth in palliative care patients and its associations with psychological distress and quality of life.
Journal
Palliative & supportive care
Author(s)
Bernard M., Poncin E., Althaus B., Borasio G.D.
ISSN
1478-9523 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1478-9515
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Posttraumatic growth (PTG) refers to positive psychological changes resulting from individuals' inner struggles with traumatic events such as life-threatening illness. Although palliative care patients are confronted with their own mortality, little is known about their PTG experience. This study investigates whether PTG is an empirically relevant concept for palliative patients by assessing the prevalence and areas of growth, and examining associations with psychological distress and quality of life.
Participants were recruited in Switzerland. Using validated questionnaires, we assessed PTG (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, PTGI), psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and quality of life (McGill-Quality of Life Questionnaire - Revised). We performed descriptive analyses, Spearman correlations, and linear regressions.
Fifty-five patients completed the PTGI, 44% of whom experienced no/low growth, 47% moderate growth, and 9% high/very high growth. Participants experienced the greatest positive changes in terms of appreciating life and relating to others. We found significant negative bivariate correlations between PTG and psychological distress (r = -0.33) and between PTG and depression (r = -0.47). Linear regressions showed that PTG is associated with depression (β = -0.468; p = 0.000), but not with anxiety or quality of life (adjusted R2 = 0.219).
Over half of our patients experienced moderate to very high growth, indicating that PTG is an empirically relevant psychological process in palliative care. PTG is associated with lower levels of depression, possibly as those experiencing growth are more able to process past traumas and build a more positive outlook on one's life and self. By contrast, the relative independence of anxiety and PTG points to the likely coexistence of positive and negative psychological responses to trauma. The lack of association between PTG and quality of life points to the uniqueness of the PTG concept in capturing how people access deeper meaning and greater appreciation of life along the path toward posttraumatic self-reconstruction.
Keywords
Palliative care, Posttraumatic growth, Psychological distress, Quality of life, Trauma
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/02/2022 12:20
Last modification date
09/03/2023 7:50
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