Medical residents' feedback on needs and acquired skills following a short course on cross-cultural competence

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Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_BA4E31501F0C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Medical residents' feedback on needs and acquired skills following a short course on cross-cultural competence
Journal
International Journal of Medical Education
Author(s)
Bardet Alicia, Green Alexander R., Paroz Sophie, Singy Pascal, Vaucher Paul, Bodenmann Patrick
ISSN
2042-6372
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Number
3
Pages
107-114
Language
english
Abstract
Objectives
The purpose of this study is to assess short and long term changes in knowledge, attitudes, and skills among medical residents following a short course on cultural competency and to explore their perspectives on the experience.
Methods
Eighteen medical residents went through a short training programme comprised of two seminars lasting 30' and 60' respectively over two days. Three months later, we conducted three focus groups, with 17 residents to explore their thoughts, perspectives and feedback about the course. To measure changes over time, we carried out a quantitative sequential survey before the seminars, three days after, and three months later using the Multicultural Assessment Questionnaire.
Results
Residents expressed a wide variety of perspectives on the main themes related to the content of the training - culture, trialogue, stereotypes, status, epidemiology, history and geopolitics - and related to its organization - relevance, volume, timing, target audience, training tools, and working material. Using the MAQ, we observed a higher global performance score (n=16) at three days (median=38) compared to results before the training (median=33) revealing a median difference of 5.5 points (z=2.4, p=0.015). This difference was still present at three months (∆=4.5, z=2.4, p=0.018), mainly due to knowledge acquisition (∆=3) rather than attitudes (∆=0) or skills (∆=1).
Conclusions
Cross-cultural competence training not only brings awareness of multicultural issues but also helps participants understand their own cultures, perception of others and preconceived ideas. Physicians' education should however also focus on improving implementation of acquired knowledge in cross-cultural competence.
Open Access
Yes
Create date
15/10/2012 15:57
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:28
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