First aid in burn injuries with counterintuitive warm water improves outcome

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B9C29778FC51
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
First aid in burn injuries with counterintuitive warm water improves outcome
Title of the conference
ESSR 2010, 45th Congress of the European Society for Surgical Research
Author(s)
Wettstein R., Tobalem M., Tschanz E., Harder Y.
Address
Geneva, Switzerland, June 9-12, 2010
ISBN
0007-1323
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Volume
97
Series
British Journal of Surgery
Pages
S46
Language
english
Notes
Meeting Abstract
Abstract
Objective:
Cooling is considered a panacea in burn injury. However,
burn injuries are characterized by an ischemic zone prone to progression,
a phenomenon that can substantially increase morbidity. Cold-induced
vasoconstriction potentially aggravates ischemia and promotes progression.
Therefore we compared the effect of warm (37°C) and cold (17°C) water on
burn progression.
Methods:
The comb burn model creates 4 rectangular burned surfaces
separated by 3 unburned interspaces that become necrotic if untreated. After
heating in boiling water the template was applied for 60 seconds on 24 Wistar
rats randomized into 3 groups: no treatment (CON); treatment for 20 minutes
with cold water (17°C: CW) or warm water (37°C: WW). Burn progression in
surface (planimetry) and Departmenth (histology), as well as microcirculatory
perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry) were assessed after 1h, as well as 1, 4, and
7 days.
Results:
Both CW and WW delayed burn progression without reducing the
final burn Departmenth (deep dermis). In contrast, only WW but not CW
increased dermal perfusion (81 ± 2% (WW) vs. 62 ± 2% (CW) and 63 ± 1%
(CON), p< 0·05) already 1 hour after burn induction. The difference observed
after one hour led to a complete flow recovery during the observation period
and translated into increased interspace survival, respectively less necrosis with
WW(65 ± 4% vs. 81 + 4% (CW) and 91 ± 2% (CON), p< 0·05) after 7 days.
Conclusions:
Application of warm water significantly improved dermal
perfusion, increased interspace survival, and delayed burn progression.However
it didn't alter the ultimate burn Departmenth of the actually burned area.
Therefore, warm water can create a therapeutic window for targeted nonsurgical
treatment of burn progression.
Web of science
Create date
21/10/2010 10:17
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:27
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