Clinically assessed consequences of workplace physical violence

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_B9C11D22666D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Clinically assessed consequences of workplace physical violence
Journal
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Author(s)
De Puy Jacqueline, Romain-Glassey Nathalie, Gut Melody, Wild Pascal, Mangin Patrice, Danuser Brigitta
ISSN
1432-1246 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0340-0131
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
88
Number
2
Pages
213-224
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Abstract
To assess consequences of physical violence at work and identify their predictors.
Among the patients in a medicolegal consultation from 2007 to 2010, the subsample of workplace violence victims (n = 185) was identified and contacted again in average 30 months after the assault. Eighty-six victims (47 %) participated. Ordinal logistic regression analyses assessed the effect of 9 potential risk factors on physical, psychological and work consequences summarized in a severity score (0-9).
Severity score distribution was as follows: 4+: 14 %; 1-3: 42 %; and 0: 44 %. Initial psychological distress resulting from the violence was a strong predictor (p < 0.001) of the severity score both on work and long-term psychological consequences. Gender and age did not reach significant levels in multivariable analyses even though female victims had overall more severe consequences. Unexpectedly, only among workers whose jobs implied high awareness of the risk of violence, first-time violence was associated with long-term psychological and physical consequences (p = 0.004). Among the factors assessed at follow-up, perceived lack of employers' support or absence of employer was associated with higher values on the severity score. The seven other assessed factors (initial physical injuries; previous experience of violence; preexisting health problems; working alone; internal violence; lack of support from colleagues; and lack of support from family or friends) were not significantly associated with the severity score.
Being a victim of workplace violence can result in long-term consequences on health and employment, their severity increases with the seriousness of initial psychological distress. Support from the employer can help prevent negative outcomes.

Keywords
Adult, Age Distribution, Crime Victims/psychology, Crime Victims/statistics & numerical data, Female, Health Status, Health Surveys, Hospitals, University, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Stress, Psychological/epidemiology, Stress, Psychological/etiology, Switzerland/epidemiology, Violence/psychology, Violence/statistics & numerical data, Workplace/psychology, Workplace/statistics & numerical data
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
10/11/2014 10:57
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:27
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