Stereologic estimates of total spinophilin-immunoreactive spine number in area 9 and the CA1 field: relationship with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B8E813B577CA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Stereologic estimates of total spinophilin-immunoreactive spine number in area 9 and the CA1 field: relationship with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
Journal
Neurobiology of aging
Author(s)
Akram A., Christoffel D., Rocher A.B., Bouras C., Kövari E., Perl D.P., Morrison J.H., Herrmann F.R., Haroutunian V., Giannakopoulos P., Hof P.R.
ISSN
1558-1497[electronic]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Number
9
Pages
1296-307
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't - Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The loss of presynaptic markers is thought to represent a strong pathologic correlate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Spinophilin is a postsynaptic marker mainly located to the heads of dendritic spines. We assessed total numbers of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta in the CA1 and CA3 fields of hippocampus and area 9 in 18 elderly individuals with various degrees of cognitive decline. The decrease in spinophilin-immunoreactivity was significantly related to both Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) staging and clinical severity but not A beta deposition staging. The total number of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta in CA1 field and area 9 were significantly related to MMSE scores and predicted 23.5 and 61.9% of its variability. The relationship between total number of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta in CA1 field and MMSE scores did not persist when adjusting for Braak NFT staging. In contrast, the total number of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta in area 9 was still significantly related to the cognitive outcome explaining an extra 9.6% of MMSE and 25.6% of the Clinical Dementia Rating scores variability. Our data suggest that neocortical dendritic spine loss is an independent parameter to consider in AD clinicopathologic correlations.
Keywords
Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Biological Markers, Dendritic Spines, Disease Progression, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Microfilament Proteins, Nerve Net, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Tissue Distribution
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
10/03/2008 11:04
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:26
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