Compulsive Health-Related Internet Use and Cyberchondria.

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State: Public
Version: author
License: CC BY-NC 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_B7E7FAC9B916
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Compulsive Health-Related Internet Use and Cyberchondria.
Journal
European addiction research
Author(s)
Khazaal Y., Chatton A., Rochat L., Hede V., Viswasam K., Penzenstadler L., Berle D., Starcevic V.
ISSN
1421-9891 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1022-6877
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Number
1
Pages
58-66
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Cyberchondria denotes excessive and repeated online health-related searches associated with an increase in health anxiety. Such searches persist in those with cyberchondria, despite the negative consequences, resembling a pattern of compulsive Internet use.
The aim of the present study was to assess compulsive health-related Internet use in relation to cyberchondria while controlling for related variables.
Adult participants (N = 749) were recruited from an online platform. They completed questionnaires assessing the severity of cyberchondria (via the Cyberchondria Severity Scale [CSS]), compulsive Internet use adapted for online health-related seeking (via the adapted Compulsive Internet Use Scale [CIUS]), and levels of intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety, as well as depressive, somatic, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. A logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify predictors of scores above a cutoff value on the CIUS, indicating compulsive health-related Internet use.
The regression output showed that only the CSS total score and sex made a unique, statistically significant contribution to the model, leading to the correct classification of 78.6% of the cases. Of the CSS subscales, compulsion and distress were the most strongly associated with compulsive health-related Internet use.
The finding that the adapted CIUS scores are associated with cyberchondria indicates that cyberchondria has a compulsive component, at least in terms of health-related Internet use. It also suggests that compulsive health-related Internet use persists despite the distress associated with this activity. Males may engage in cyberchondria more compulsively than females. These findings have implications for research and clinical practice.
Keywords
Compulsive Internet use, Cyberchondria, Health anxiety, Internet addiction
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/11/2020 10:43
Last modification date
02/11/2021 6:39
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