Sleep in human narcolepsy revisited with special reference to prior wakefulness duration.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B7E514C35EB6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sleep in human narcolepsy revisited with special reference to prior wakefulness duration.
Journal
Sleep
Author(s)
Tafti M., Villemin E., Carlander B., Besset A., Billiard M.
ISSN
0161-8105[print], 0161-8105[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/1992
Volume
15
Number
4
Pages
344-351
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Sleep of 11 narcoleptic subjects was recorded on baseline and after 16 and 24 hours of prior wakefulness (16 and 24 hours sleep deprivation). Eleven sex- and age-matched control subjects were recorded for comparisons. All recordings in narcoleptic subjects were characterized by frequent sleep onset rapid eye movement (REM) episodes, increased amounts of wake time after sleep onset and low sleep efficiencies. Mean total sleep time (TST) was significantly decreased in narcoleptic subjects after sleep deprivation (SD). Recovery sleep after 24 hours SD showed reduced nonREM (NREM) sleep stage 2 percentage, whereas percentages of stage 4 and slow-wave sleep (SWS = stages 3 + 4) were significantly increased. The values of REM sleep percentage of TST were remarkably constant throughout and did not differ significantly as a function of experimental conditions, indicating a normal REM sleep pressure in narcolepsy. Sleep stage analysis per sleep cycles revealed significant differences between the two groups. Percentages of stage 4 and SWS were increased during the first cycle of recovery sleep in narcoleptic subjects. Stage 2 was decreased during the third cycle, and SWS decreased rapidly from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and slightly increased thereafter. These results indicate that sleep need is increased in narcolepsy, whereas its decrease over the first NREM-REM cycle is accelerated. We hypothesize that this could reflect an alteration of the homeostatic process of sleep regulation in narcolepsy.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Female, Humans, Male, Narcolepsy/physiopathology, Reaction Time/physiology, Sleep/physiology, Time Factors, Wakefulness/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 15:55
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:26
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