Homocysteine et maladie thrombo-embolique veineuse. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism]

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B7BAF7878A78
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Homocysteine et maladie thrombo-embolique veineuse. [Homocysteine and venous thromboembolism]
Journal
Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift
Author(s)
Monnerat  C., Hayoz  D.
ISSN
0036-7672 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/1997
Volume
127
Number
36
Pages
1489-96
Notes
English Abstract
Journal Article
Review --- Old month value: Sep 6
Abstract
Congenital homocysteinuria is a rare inherited metabolic disorder with early onset atherosclerosis and arterial and venous trombosis. Moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is more frequently encountered and is recognized as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Several case-control studies demonstrate an association between venous thromboembolism and moderate hyperhomocysteinemia. A patient with moderate hyperhomocysteinemia has a 2-3 relative risk of developing an episode of venous thromboembolism. The occurrence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in heterozygotes for the mutation of Leiden factor V involves a 10-fold increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism. The biochemical mechanism by which homocysteine may promote thrombosis is not fully recognized. Homocysteine inhibits the expression of thrombomodulin, the thrombin cofactor responsible for protein C activation, and inhibits antithrombin-III binding. Treatment with folic acid reduces the plasma level of homocysteinemia, but no study has demonstrated its efficacy in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism or atherosclerosis. Hyperhomocysteinemia should be included in the screening of abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism, and mild hyperhomocysteinemia may justify a trial of folic acid.
Keywords
Adolescent Adult Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors/blood/drug therapy/*genetics Female Folic Acid/therapeutic use Heterozygote Detection Homocysteine/*blood Humans Male Middle Aged Risk Thromboembolism/blood/drug therapy/*genetics Thrombophlebitis/blood/drug therapy/*genetics
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
17/01/2008 16:38
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:25
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