Gut colonization by a novel Clostridium species is associated with the onset of epizootic rabbit enteropathy.

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Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_B62C5FD80422
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Gut colonization by a novel Clostridium species is associated with the onset of epizootic rabbit enteropathy.
Journal
Veterinary Research
Author(s)
Djukovic A., Garcia-Garcera M., Martínez-Paredes E., Isaac S., Artacho A., Martínez J., Ubeda C.
ISSN
1297-9716 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0928-4249
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Number
1
Pages
123
Language
english
Abstract
Epizootic rabbit enteropathy (ERE) represents one of the most devastating diseases affecting rabbit farms. Previous studies showing transmissibility of disease symptoms through oral inoculation of intestinal contents from sick animals suggested a bacterial infectious origin for ERE. However, no etiological agent has been identified yet. On the other hand, ERE is associated with major changes in intestinal microbial communities, pinpointing dysbiosis as an alternative cause for the disease. To better understand the role of intestinal bacteria in ERE development, we have performed a prospective longitudinal study in which intestinal samples collected from the same animals before, during and after disease onset were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing. Changes in hundreds of bacterial groups were detected after the initiation of ERE. In contrast, before ERE onset, the microbiota from rabbits that developed ERE did not differ from those that remained healthy. Notably, an expansion of a single novel Clostridium species (Clostridium cuniculi) was detected the day of ERE onset. C. cuniculi encodes several putative toxins and it is phylogenetically related to the two well-characterized pathogens C. botulinum and C. perfringens. Our results are consistent with a bacterial infectious origin of ERE and discard dysbiosis as the initial trigger of the disease. Although experimental validation is required, results derived from sequencing analysis, propose a key role of C. cuniculi in ERE initiation.
Keywords
Animals, Clostridium/classification, Clostridium/physiology, Clostridium Infections/microbiology, Clostridium Infections/veterinary, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Intestinal Diseases/microbiology, Intestines/microbiology, Longitudinal Studies, Prospective Studies, Rabbits
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/01/2019 15:25
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:24
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