Representational pseudoneglect and reference points both influence geographic location estimates.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_B609ED052FBF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Representational pseudoneglect and reference points both influence geographic location estimates.
Journal
Psychonomic bulletin & review
Author(s)
Friedman A., Mohr C., Brugger P.
ISSN
1531-5320 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1069-9384
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Number
2
Pages
277-284
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Our mental representation of the world is far from objective. For example, western Canadians estimate the locations of North American cities to be too far to the west. This bias could be due to a reference point effect, in which people estimate more space between places close to them than far from them, or to representational pseudoneglect, in which neurologically intact individuals favor the left side of space when asked to image a scene. We tested whether either or both of these biases influence the geographic world representations of neurologically intact young adults from Edmonton and Ottawa, which are in western and eastern Canada, respectively. Individuals were asked to locate North American cities on a two-dimensional grid. Both groups revealed effects of representational pseudoneglect in this novel paradigm, but they also each exhibited reference point effects. These results inform theories in both cognitive psychology and neuroscience.

Keywords
Canada, Female, Geography, Humans, Male, Maps as Topic, Photic Stimulation, Space Perception, United States, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/12/2011 9:55
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:24
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