Measurement characteristics of 2 different self-monitoring tools used in a dietary intervention study

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B5D456E9881A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Measurement characteristics of 2 different self-monitoring tools used in a dietary intervention study
Journal
Journal of the American Dietetic Association
Author(s)
Tinker  L. F., Patterson  R. E., Kristal  A. R., Bowen  D. J., Kuniyuki  A., Henry  H., Shattuck  A.
ISSN
0002-8223 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2001
Volume
101
Number
9
Pages
1031-40
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S. --- Old month value: Sep
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the measurement characteristics of 2 self-monitoring tools, a food diary and fat scan, used in the dietary intervention of the Women's Health Trial: Feasibility in Minority Populations study. DESIGN: Comparison of fat intake reported on the self-monitoring tools to a criterion measure of fat intake, specifically the mean of a food frequency questionnaire and a 4-day food record. The main outcome measures were differences in fat grams and correlations between each of the self-monitoring tools and the criterion measure. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Six-month postrandomization data from 313 women aged 50 to 79 years who participated in the intervention group of the Women's Health Trial: Feasibility in Minority Populations study. RESULTS: Both self-monitoring tools underestimated fat intake compared to the criterion measure, the food diary by 9 g and the fat scan by 6 g. The self-monitoring instruments were better than chance at detecting a low-fat dietary pattern, however, and did not differ from each other in their ability to do so. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: The self-monitoring tools were modestly precise as measures of fat intake, but neither was sufficiently accurate to be reliable as a sole assessment of dietary adherence. Dietetics professionals are encouraged to assess the measurement properties of self-monitoring tools to use them appropriately in supporting dietary changes.
Keywords
Aged Cohort Studies *Diet Records Dietary Fats/*administration & dosage Female Food Habits/*psychology Health Behavior Humans Life Style Middle Aged Nutrition Assessment *Patient Compliance Questionnaires ROC Curve Self Disclosure Sensitivity and Specificity
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 20:49
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:24
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