Sexual selection favours good or bad genes for pathogen resistance depending on males' pathogen exposure.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_B4E31BEFE409
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sexual selection favours good or bad genes for pathogen resistance depending on males' pathogen exposure.
Journal
Proceedings of the Royal Society. B Biological sciences
Author(s)
Joye P., Kawecki T.J.
ISSN
1471-2954 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-8452
Publication state
Published
Issued date
15/05/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
286
Number
1902
Pages
20190226
Language
english
Abstract
Resistance to pathogens is often invoked as an indirect benefit of female choice, but experimental evidence for links between father's sexual success and offspring resistance is scarce and equivocal. Two proposed mechanisms might generate such links. Under the first, heritable resistance to diverse pathogens depends on general immunocompetence; owing to shared condition dependence, male sexual traits indicate immunocompetence independently of the male's pathogen exposure. By contrast, other hypotheses (e.g. Hamilton-Zuk) assume that sexual traits only reveal heritable resistance if the males have been exposed to the pathogen. The distinction between the two mechanisms has been neglected by experimental studies. We show that Drosophila melanogaster males that are successful in mating contests (one female with two males) sire sons that are substantially more resistant to the intestinal pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila-but only if the males have themselves been exposed to the pathogen before the mating contest. By contrast, sons of males sexually successful in the absence of pathogen exposure are less resistant than sons of unsuccessful males. We detected no differences in daughters' resistance. Thus, while sexual selection may have considerable consequences for offspring resistance, these consequences may be sex-specific. Furthermore, contrary to the 'general immunocompetence' hypothesis, these consequences can be positive or negative depending on the epidemiological context under which sexual selection operates.
Keywords
good genes, parasites, immunocompetence, Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis, female choice, Drosophila, Drosophila, Hamilton–Zuk hypothesis, female choice, good genes, immunocompetence, parasites
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
10/05/2019 10:14
Last modification date
07/06/2019 6:11
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