Patients', carers' and clinicians' attitudes towards alternative terms to describe the at-risk for psychosis state.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B4C73C7023D8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Patients', carers' and clinicians' attitudes towards alternative terms to describe the at-risk for psychosis state.
Journal
Schizophrenia research
Author(s)
Polari A., Street R., Conus P., Finkelstein A., Hartmann J.A., Kim S.W., McGorry P., Schley C., Simmons M., Stratford J., Thompson A., Yung A., Nelson B., Lavoie S.
ISSN
1573-2509 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0920-9964
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/09/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
237
Pages
69-75
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Language used in psychiatry is important because it provides an understandable and accurate way of describing clinical and theoretical concepts. The use of labels in psychiatry has often been associated with stigma and reduced engagement with clinical services. This studys aims were to generate new terms for the 'at-risk mental state' (ARMS) concept and to investigate what young people, their caregivers and clinicians thought about them as well as terms commonly used in early intervention clinics. Another aim was to understand participants preference related to the best timing to introduce the at-risk concept and the extent and context of the information presented.
New terms illustrating the at-risk concept have been generated by a youth reference group with lived experience of mental illness: 'pre-diagnosis stage' (PDS), potential of developing a mental illness (PDMI) and disposition for developing a mental illness (DDMI). A specifically designed questionnaire was administered to 46 patients with ARMS, 24 caregivers and 52 clinicians to obtain their feedback on newly proposed terms and on the terms already used in clinical practice and research.
The preferred terms were PDS, PDMI and ARMS. The least favoured terms were Ultra High Risk and Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome, which were thought to be associated with the most stigma. Most participants agreed that disclosure about diagnosis should be delivered early by the key clinician.
Patients generated terms such as PDS, PDMI, alongside ARMS should be considered to be used in clinical practice. They present with low stigma and are illustrative of young peoples difficulties.
Keywords
ARMS, Caregivers, Stigma, Terminology, UHR, Youth participation
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
21/09/2021 12:39
Last modification date
10/12/2021 6:39
Usage data